Showing posts with label anatomy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label anatomy. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Syphilitic Moulages, White Chocolate Carrion Crow Skulls, and Hand Printed Anatomical Postcards : Valentine's Day Gifts at the Morbid Anatomy Museum Giftshop!

Looking for a Valentine's Day gift for that special--and perhaps slightly eccentric and hard to shop for--someone? The Morbid Anatomy Museum Gift Shop might have just the thing.

Perhaps your beloved might appreciate a unique, ready to hang wax moulage depicting secondary syphilis of the face, handcrafted by our "Moulagist in Residence" Nicole Antebi (top image/$100; more here)? 

If that's not quite right, then perhaps one of our exclusive limited edition hand-printed anatomical postcards by Brooklyn artist Mark Splatter (second image down/$2; more here) would fit the bill? 

Or maybe a better fit would be one of our Morbid Anatomy Calendars (now on sale for only $12; regularly $20!) filled with photographs of uncanny objects found in obscure collections, and noting such dates such as the birthday of Edward Gorey, the first performance at Paris' Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, Dia de los Muertos and Santa Muerte's Feast Day (third image down/$12; more here)? 

If your sweetie prefers sweets, then perhaps our white Belgian chocolate carrion crow skull (now on sale for only $16; regularly $20!) by UK based Conjurers Kitchen might be of interest (fourth image down/On sale for $16; more here)? 

If not, then perhaps they might fancy a set of four Morbid Anatomy Museum coasters with our logo--a fetal skeleton from Frederik Ruysch's early 18th century book "Thesaurus Anatomicus," illustration by Cornelius Huyberts--might be just the thing (fifth image down/4 for $5; more here)?

You can find out more about all of these objects by clicking here. You can see all the Morbid Anatomy Museum offerings by clicking here.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Anatomical Venuses in 19th Century NYC, Gallivanting Fetal Skeletons and Human Anatomy in 18th Century Color: Morbid Anatomy Guest Posts for the New York Academy of Medicine Blog

Interested in knowing more about Anatomical Venuses on display to the paying public in 19th century New York City (top image)? Or maybe you'd like to see some adorably animated fetal skeletons drawn from a circa 1600 publication (middle image)? Or perhaps you'd be interested in learning about vibrant color renderings of human anatomy dating back to the early 1700s?

If any or all of these things are of interest, click here to check out some new, heavily-illustrated Morbid Anatomy guest posts on the wonderful New York Academy of Medicine's "Books, Health and History" Blog!

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Art and Anatomy Intensive Summer School Course with Sarah Simblet, Brian Catling and Eleanor Crook: Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford, 2013

My good friend--and one of my favorite artists--Eleanor Crook just brought to my attention a fantastic looking art and anatomy intensive course taking place this summer at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art in Oxford. At £950.00 its a bit on the cost-y side, but what a great looking week of classes! By the end of the 7th day, you will have learned the skeleton and musculature and you will leave the course with your own hand-crafted wax model of the head and neck and ecorché (muscle figure) and, as the copy puts it, "a portfolio of new work, a much wider understanding of the subject explored and a wealth of ideas for future artistic development." Plus you get to learn from such wonderful artists as Sarah Simblet, Brian Catling and Eleanor Crook.

There are two sessions to choose form; the first is Sunday 4th August - Saturday 10th August
and the second is from Sunday 1st September - Saturday 7th September. Full details follow; You can find out more here and book a place by clicking here.
Art and Anatomy Course
Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford
With instructors Dr Sarah Simblet, Brian Catling and Eleanor Crook
Session 1: Sunday 4th August - Saturday 10th August 2013
Session 2: Sunday 1st September - Saturday 7th September 2013
(Please note, both courses offer the same programme)
The fee for each course is £950.00; Places can be booked here.
I found this course a unique opportunity as it is taught by artists that have learned directly from dissecting bodies. Also, the tutors present the subject with an exciting approach as this is what they are passionate about.’
--Jaime, Summer School Participant 2011

‘Such intensity of learning the musculature was really interesting, now fully appreciate how intricately the tissues intertwined.  I’m fascinated!’  -- Summer School Participant 2012
Dr Sarah Simblet continues to offer her highly successful Art and Anatomy course in 2013. Based around Dr Simblet’s best selling book, Anatomy for the Artist, Dorling Kindersley,this year we have extended the course to 7 days. The course continues to cover aspects of human anatomy, its drawing and history.For the third year, the Ruskin will be offering two non-residential courses on Art and Anatomy. Human anatomy is explored through intensive workshops, lectures and group discussions, with time for personal studio work. Participants need to bring their own drawing materials and the Ruskin will provide easels, paper and life models. No academic or artistic criteria is required for attendance at either course although all participants must be 16 years old and over.
Participants can expect to leave our Summer School with a portfolio of new work, a much wider understanding of the subject explored and a wealth of ideas for future artistic development.

To book a place on either of these courses, please go to the University’s online booking page for Short Courses: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk
Programme
Day 1         :    Structural Drawing
Day 2         :    The Skeleton
Day 3         :    Musculature
Days 4       :    Wax Modelling Head & Neck
Day 5         :    Wax Modelling Ecorché (muscle figure)
Day 6         :    Personal studio time with tutor
Day 7         :    Life Drawing
COURSE TEACHING STAFF

Dr Sarah Simblet
Sarah Simblet is an artist who writes and draws. She is also a broadcaster, lecturer and anatomist with broad research interests in the relationship between art, science and history. She has published three major art reference books with Dorling Kindersley: ‘Anatomy for the Artist’, ‘The Drawing Book’ and ‘Botany for the Artist’ and exhibits her drawings through her books. Sarah contributes to contemporary art shows, festivals and live events and her work is held in national and private collections. She contributes regularly to British, American and international television and radio programmes about science and art, and consults on national exhibitions. She is Tutor in Anatomy at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, University of Oxford, a freelance lecturer at the National Gallery London, and Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and is an academic member of Wolfson College, Oxford.
http://unitedagents.co.uk/sarah-simblet
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2005/sep/25/arts.artsnews
http://www.dorlingkindersley-uk.co.uk/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780751334418,00.html

Professor Brian Catling
An academic, poet and contemporary artist who has had a life long fascination with the visualisation of human anatomy in everything from wood blocks to science fiction.  Brian is a Professor at the University of Oxford, on the teaching staff at the Ruskin and a Fellow at Linacre College.
http://briancatling.com/

Eleanor Crook
Eleanor Crook is one of the world’s leading anatomical modellers in wax: a contemporary artist who uses traditional and newly invented techniques to express and explain the drama of the human body.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVL7nE4UiIs
Image: Side of Head Without Skin, from Anatomia Humani Corporis or Ontleding des Menschelyken Lichaams, Govard Bidloo, 1690

Saturday, December 1, 2012

Anatomical Flap Book GIF Animations, from 1901 Anatomical Textbook

As posted by Maria Popova on the Brainpickings Website; more here.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Congress for Curious Peoples One-Day Symposium: London Edition, Last Tuesday Society, This Saturday, September 8

 This Saturday, September 8, you are cordially invited to join myself and a host of distinguished scholars, makers, and museum folk as we investigate, via a one day symposium termed "The Congress for Curious Peoples," some of the provocative intersections explored in the exhibition "Ecstatic Raptures and Immaculate Corpses: Visions of Death Made Beautiful in Italy," on view at the London-based Last Tuesday Society until the end of the month.

This first ever UK edition of The Congress for Curious Peoples will feature participants from The Wellcome Collection, The Wellcome Library, and The Gordon Museum of Pathology, as well as some of my very favorite artists, thinkers and scholars, and will take on such heady topics as enchantment and enlightenment, or the sublimation of the magical into the rational world; the secret life of objects, or the non-rational allure of objects and the psychology of collecting; and beautiful death and incorruptible bodies, or the shared drive to immortalize the human body and aestheticize death in both medicine and Catholicism, and will

Full info follows; hope very very much to see you there!
Congress for Curious Peoples: London Edition
Date: Saturday September 8

Time: 11am - 5:30 pm
Admission: £15.00 (Tickets here)
Location: The Last Tuesday Society
Address: 11 Mare Street, London, E8 4RP

Produced by Morbid Anatomy

11-12: Introduction by Morbid Anatomy's Joanna EbensteinKeynote panel: Enchantment and Enlightenment (20 minute presentations followed by moderated discussion)
12-1: Lunch
1-2:30 The Secret Life of Objects: The Allure of Objects and the Psychology of Collecting (20 minute presentations followed by moderated discussion)
2:30-3:00 Break
3:00-5:30 Beautiful Death and Incorruptible Bodies: Eternal Life and Aestheticized Death in Medicine and Catholicism (15 minute presentations followed by moderated discussion)
You can find out more by clicking here, and purchase tickets by clicking here.

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Human Anatomy, Jan Švankmajer, “Historia Naturae,” 1967

A gif animation of some human anatomy from Jan Švankmajer's “Historia Naturae” (1967), as found on the Wunderkammer blog. You can watch this delightful film in its entirety by clicking here.

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

"Objectify This: Female Anatomy Dissected and Displayed," Exhibition Curated by Street Anatomy's Vanessa Ruiz, September 7-29, Chicago

Just received notice of the very exciting looking exhibition "Objectify This: Female Anatomy Dissected" curated by Vanessa Ruiz, founder of the wonderful Street Anatomy Blog; images from the show above, and full info follows:
'OBJECTIFY THIS: Female Anatomy Dissected and Displayed', a group exhibition of paintings and illustrations featuring the underlying anatomy of the female body.
September 7th – September 29th
Design Cloud Gallery
118 N. Peoria St. 2N, Chicago, IL

Opening event Friday, September 7th, 6–10p.m. with burlesque performances by Chicago's Vaudezilla troupe.

Throughout time, female anatomical illustration has evoked a multitude of feelings beyond simple academic representation. It's one of the reasons why the male form has been the exemplum of the human body throughout time, with the female being illustrated only as the variation in terms of reproductive organs and surface anatomy. This gallery show seeks to portray females only in relation to other females. It will compel viewers to question the objectivity surrounding ‘female anatomy’ and define—or re-define—their own perceptions through the art, perspectives, literature, and live burlesque performances.

Featured artists: Fernando Vicente, Jason Levesque, Cake, Michael Reedy, Emily Evans, Danny Quirk, Pole Ka, Tristan des Limbes, Amylin Loglisci.
You can find out more by clicking here.

Images, Top to bottom (click on images to see larger version):
  1. "American Housewife" by Fernando Vicente
  2. "Anatomical Meluxine" by Jason Levesque, 2012
  3. "Christina" by Danny Quirk, 2010

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Just a Few More Slots Left: "Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures," Class with Artist Saul Chernick, Observatory, June 25-July 16


We still have a few more slots available for the class "Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures" with one of our favorite artists, Saul Chernick. This class will teach students--via illustrated lectures and in-class projects including paper puppets and the creation of bestiary pages--"to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject" and "learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity."

You can see some of Chernick's wonderful artworks above; you can see more of them by clicking here. The class will take place on 4 consecutive Mondays, starting tomorrow night June 25 and running until July 16th. The full class description follows. Also, please note that the class size is limited to 15, so if you are interested, please RSVP as soon as possible to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.

Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures with Saul Chernick
A 4-part class with Artist Saul Chernick, M.F.A., Rutgers University
Dates: Mondays June 25, July 2, July 9 and July 16th (4 consecutive Mondays)
Time: 6:30-9:00 PM
Class Fee: $120
***Class size limited to 15; Must RSVP to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com
This class is part of The Morbid Anatomy Art Academy
Contemporary artist and arts educator Saul Chernick is renowned for gorgeous artworks featuring convincingly corporeal depictions of imaginary or mythical creatures rendered in the style of Medieval and early Renaissance woodcuts from Northern Europe. Observatory is very pleased to announce a new workshop developed by Saul Chernick specially for the Morbid Anatomy Art Academy. In this class, Chernick will teach students--via illustrated lectures and in-class projects including paper puppets and bestiary pages--"to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject" and "learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity."
Full class description follows; you can see more of Chernick's fantastic work by clicking here. Class size limited to 15; Please RSVP to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.
Course Description
Open to artists of all levels, the goal of this workshop is help participants learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity. Through exercises in drawing and paper puppetry, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the skeletal/muscular structures of most mammals, reptiles, and birds. Participants will also learn to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject and create works of convincing visual fiction!
What to expect
  • Participants will cull images from the web to create a dossier on the animal(s) that interest them
  • Participants will fashion movable paper puppets to understand how their chosen animal moves
  • Participants will draw studies of the skeletal and muscular structures of animals
  • Participants will use the medium of their choice to create a Bestiary page entry that depicts an animal situated in an environment
Materials
What to bring to the first class:
  • Choose 1-3 animals and gather pictures on the web. Be sure to get images of their skeletons in profile. Please print these as they may be hard to use on a phone screen.
  • 3-5 sheets of Bristol Board Paper 9" x 12" or larger
  • Pencils & erasers
  • Scissors
  • Xacto or utility knife
  • Glue
What to bring for subsequent classes:
  • White or tinted drawing paper 16" x 20" or 18" x 24"
  • Tracing paper (same size as drawing paper)
  • Mechanical and/or regular pencils (2h, hb, 2b, 4b)
Optional:
  • Markers, watercolors, gouache, ink, brushes, chalk/oil pastels, colored pencils, Caran D’Ache, collage papers, etc (we’ll discuss further in detail!)
Saul Chernick, M.F.A., Rutgers University, is a visual artist and educator. Chernick has exhibited internationally in galleries and museums including the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, the Bronx Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum of Art, as well as Max Protetch and Meulensteen Galleries in New York City. He has taught art for the public school system, the 92nd Street Y, Cooper Union, Parson's School of Design, and the Museum of Modern Art. He is currently the Professional Development Coordinator for the Joan Mitchell Foundation where he coaches New York artists in teaching art to young people throughout city. His work can be seen at www.saulchernick.com.

All images are by Saul Chernick and include, top to bottom:
  1. Field Urchin, 2011, from a series of studies in which he attempted to impose the proportions of cherubs onto horses.
  2. Desktop 2013, 2010, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  3. Heavenly Touch , 2009, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  4. Guilty Pleasures, 2010, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  5. Ars Gratia Artis, 2010, Ink on Paper
You can found out more here. As mentioned above, class size is limited to 15, so if you are interested, please RSVP as soon as you are able to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

A Few More Slots Left: "Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures," Class with Artist Saul Chernick, Observatory, June 25-July 16


We still have just a few more slots available for the upcoming class "Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures" with one of our favorite artists, Saul Chernick. This class will teach students--via illustrated lectures and in-class projects including paper puppets and the creation of bestiary pages--"to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject" and "learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity."

You can see some of Chernick's wonderful artworks above; you can see more of them by clicking here. The class will take place on 4 consectutive Mondays, from June 25 to July 16th. The full class description follows. Also, please note that the class size is limited to 15, so if you are interested, please RSVP as soon as possible to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.

Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures with Saul Chernick
A 4-part class with Artist Saul Chernick, M.F.A., Rutgers University
Dates: Mondays June 25, July 2, July 9 and July 16th (4 consecutive Mondays)
Time: 6:30-9:00 PM
Class Fee: $120
***Class size limited to 15; Must RSVP to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com
This class is part of The Morbid Anatomy Art Academy
Contemporary artist and arts educator Saul Chernick is renowned for gorgeous artworks featuring convincingly corporeal depictions of imaginary or mythical creatures rendered in the style of Medieval and early Renaissance woodcuts from Northern Europe. Observatory is very pleased to announce a new workshop developed by Saul Chernick specially for the Morbid Anatomy Art Academy. In this class, Chernick will teach students--via illustrated lectures and in-class projects including paper puppets and bestiary pages--"to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject" and "learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity."
Full class description follows; you can see more of Chernick's fantastic work by clicking here. Class size limited to 15; Please RSVP to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.
Course Description
Open to artists of all levels, the goal of this workshop is help participants learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity. Through exercises in drawing and paper puppetry, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the skeletal/muscular structures of most mammals, reptiles, and birds. Participants will also learn to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject and create works of convincing visual fiction!
What to expect
  • Participants will cull images from the web to create a dossier on the animal(s) that interest them
  • Participants will fashion movable paper puppets to understand how their chosen animal moves
  • Participants will draw studies of the skeletal and muscular structures of animals
  • Participants will use the medium of their choice to create a Bestiary page entry that depicts an animal situated in an environment
Materials
What to bring to the first class:
  • Choose 1-3 animals and gather pictures on the web. Be sure to get images of their skeletons in profile. Please print these as they may be hard to use on a phone screen.
  • 3-5 sheets of Bristol Board Paper 9" x 12" or larger
  • Pencils & erasers
  • Scissors
  • Xacto or utility knife
  • Glue
What to bring for subsequent classes:
  • White or tinted drawing paper 16" x 20" or 18" x 24"
  • Tracing paper (same size as drawing paper)
  • Mechanical and/or regular pencils (2h, hb, 2b, 4b)
Optional:
  • Markers, watercolors, gouache, ink, brushes, chalk/oil pastels, colored pencils, Caran D’Ache, collage papers, etc (we’ll discuss further in detail!)
Saul Chernick, M.F.A., Rutgers University, is a visual artist and educator. Chernick has exhibited internationally in galleries and museums including the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, the Bronx Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum of Art, as well as Max Protetch and Meulensteen Galleries in New York City. He has taught art for the public school system, the 92nd Street Y, Cooper Union, Parson's School of Design, and the Museum of Modern Art. He is currently the Professional Development Coordinator for the Joan Mitchell Foundation where he coaches New York artists in teaching art to young people throughout city. His work can be seen at www.saulchernick.com.

All images are by Saul Chernick and include, top to bottom:
  1. Field Urchin, 2011, from a series of studies in which he attempted to impose the proportions of cherubs onto horses.
  2. Desktop 2013, 2010, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  3. Heavenly Touch , 2009, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  4. Guilty Pleasures, 2010, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  5. Ars Gratia Artis, 2010, Ink on Paper
You can found out more here. As mentioned above, class size is limited to 15, so if you are interested, please RSVP as soon as you are able to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.

Thursday, May 17, 2012

"Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures," Class with Artist Saul Chernick, Observatory, June 25-July 16


I am very excited to announce "Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures, a new class developed specially for The Morbid Anatomy Art Academy by one of our favorite artists, Saul Chernick. This class will teach students--via illustrated lectures and in-class projects including paper puppets and the creation of bestiary pages--"to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject" and "learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity."

You can see some of Chernick's wonderful artworks above; you can see more of them by clicking here. The class will take place on 4 consectutive Mondays, from June 25 to July 16th. The full class description follows. Also, please note that the class size is limited to 15, so if you are interested, please RSVP as soon as possible to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.

Drawing from the Bestiary: Animal Anatomy of Real and Imagined Creatures with Saul Chernick
A 4-part class with Artist Saul Chernick, M.F.A., Rutgers University
Dates: Mondays June 25, July 2, July 9 and July 16th (4 consecutive Mondays)
Time: 6:30-9:00 PM
Class Fee: $120
***Class size limited to 15; Must RSVP to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com
This class is part of The Morbid Anatomy Art Academy
Contemporary artist and arts educator Saul Chernick is renowned for gorgeous artworks featuring convincingly corporeal depictions of imaginary or mythical creatures rendered in the style of Medieval and early Renaissance woodcuts from Northern Europe. Observatory is very pleased to announce a new workshop developed by Saul Chernick specially for the Morbid Anatomy Art Academy. In this class, Chernick will teach students--via illustrated lectures and in-class projects including paper puppets and bestiary pages--"to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject" and "learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity."
Full class description follows; you can see more of Chernick's fantastic work by clicking here. Class size limited to 15; Please RSVP to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.
Course Description
Open to artists of all levels, the goal of this workshop is help participants learn to draw animals (real, mythic, and otherwise) with greater skill and sensitivity. Through exercises in drawing and paper puppetry, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the skeletal/muscular structures of most mammals, reptiles, and birds. Participants will also learn to use observational and imaginative drawing skills in tandem to capture the essential qualities of their subject and create works of convincing visual fiction!
What to expect
  • Participants will cull images from the web to create a dossier on the animal(s) that interest them
  • Participants will fashion movable paper puppets to understand how their chosen animal moves
  • Participants will draw studies of the skeletal and muscular structures of animals
  • Participants will use the medium of their choice to create a Bestiary page entry that depicts an animal situated in an environment
Materials
What to bring to the first class:
  • Choose 1-3 animals and gather pictures on the web. Be sure to get images of their skeletons in profile. Please print these as they may be hard to use on a phone screen.
  • 3-5 sheets of Bristol Board Paper 9" x 12" or larger
  • Pencils & erasers
  • Scissors
  • Xacto or utility knife
  • Glue
What to bring for subsequent classes:
  • White or tinted drawing paper 16" x 20" or 18" x 24"
  • Tracing paper (same size as drawing paper)
  • Mechanical and/or regular pencils (2h, hb, 2b, 4b)
Optional:
  • Markers, watercolors, gouache, ink, brushes, chalk/oil pastels, colored pencils, Caran D’Ache, collage papers, etc (we’ll discuss further in detail!)
Saul Chernick, M.F.A., Rutgers University, is a visual artist and educator. Chernick has exhibited internationally in galleries and museums including the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, the Bronx Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum of Art, as well as Max Protetch and Meulensteen Galleries in New York City. He has taught art for the public school system, the 92nd Street Y, Cooper Union, Parson's School of Design, and the Museum of Modern Art. He is currently the Professional Development Coordinator for the Joan Mitchell Foundation where he coaches New York artists in teaching art to young people throughout city. His work can be seen at www.saulchernick.com.

All images are by Saul Chernick and include, top to bottom:
  1. Field Urchin, 2011, from a series of studies in which he attempted to impose the proportions of cherubs onto horses.
  2. Desktop 2013, 2010, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  3. Heavenly Touch , 2009, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  4. Guilty Pleasures, 2010, Ink, Watercolor, & Opaque White on Paper
  5. Ars Gratia Artis, 2010, Ink on Paper
You can found out more here. As mentioned above, class size is limited to 15, so if you are interested, please RSVP as soon as you are able to morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com.

Sunday, April 1, 2012

Damien Hirst, Hymn, On View Outside The Tate Modern


Thanks to Morbid Anatomy reader Greg Freeman for sending me this photo of Damien Hirst's controversial Hymn sculpture, which is on view outside the Tate Modern as part of a soon-to-open Hirst retrospective; more on that exhibition here.

Monday, March 26, 2012

Comparative Anatomy: Animals and the Fundamentals of Drawing Weekend Workshop with Chris Muller, NYU Tisch School of the Arts, May 5 & 6, Observatory


Very much hope to see you at this newly announced class, the latest addition to the Morbid Anatomy Art Academy series I am organizing at Observatory!

Comparative Anatomy: Animals and the Fundamentals of Drawing Weekend Workshop
A weekend workshop with Chris Muller, NYU's Tisch School of the Arts
Dates: Saturday May 5 & Sunday May 6

Time: 1 - 4 PM
Fee: $75
(includes museum admission)
*** Class size limited to 15; Must RSVP to
morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com
This class is part of The Morbid Anatomy Art Academy

Using animal and human anatomy as a jumping off point, this course will look at the ground-level, first principles of drawing as representation. Focusing mainly on mammal anatomy, we’ll look at the basic shared forms between humans and other animals, how these forms dictate movement, and how to express those forms.

Saturday’s class will be held at Observatory, where with the aid of several skeletons we’ll look at basic structures, sprinkling our exploration with odd facts and observations. Messy investigatory drawings will ensue.

Sunday’s class will be a field trip to the American Museum of Natural History, where applying the principles of Saturday’s class we’ll create beautiful drawings of the animals on display. Then, mastery attained, we will stride forth into the world, better artists and better people.

Materials

Saturday

  • Sketchbook or sketchpad, 11 X 14 or larger
  • B and HB pencils
  • Colored pencils, in the reds and blues and browns
  • Hand pencil sharpener
  • Erasers

Sunday

  • All of the above, with perhaps a portable sketchbook in place of the larger sketchpad
  • Portable folding stool (optional)

Chris Muller is an artist and exhibit designer based in Brooklyn. He has designed exhibits for the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum for African Art, the Children's Museum of Manhattan, and many others. He has designed sets for Laurie Anderson, Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, the Atlantic Theater Company, and others. He teaches drawing and digital painting at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts.

You can find out more here; you can RSVP by emailing me at morbidanatomy [at] gmail.com. You can find out more about the Morbid Anatomy Art Academy by clicking here.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Selling the Dead: Anatomy as Business in the Dutch Golden Age, Lecture this Friday by Daniel Margocsy at Observatory


This Friday at Observatory! Hope to see you there.

Selling the Dead: Anatomy as Business in the Dutch Golden Age
An Illustrated Lecture with
Daniel Margocsy of Hunter College
Date: Friday, March 23rd
Time: 8:00
Admission: $5
Presented by Morbid Anatomy

What can dead bodies tell you about the secret of life? And how can you make money from investigating these secrets? This lecture takes us back to the Dutch Golden Age when anatomists busily engaged with cutting up cadavers, orangoutans and exotic toads to study the circulation of blood, sweat and tears. Sumptuous paintings, color prints, illustrated atlases, wax preparations and bottled embryos showcased and touted the latest discoveries about the human body.

It was a good business to do anatomy. Immortalized by Rembrandt’s Anatomy Lesson, Dr. Tulp was one of the richest men in Amsterdam, and Frederik Ruysch amassed a fortune from selling his anatomical specimens to the Russian czar. The talk reveals the entrepreneurial life of Dutch physicians, surgeons and apothecaries who transformed decaying cadavers into material wealth.

Daniel Margocsy is assistant professor of early modern history at Hunter College – CUNY. He received his PhD in the history of science from Harvard University in 2009. He has published articles in the Journal of the History of Ideas, the British Journal for the History of Science and the Netherlands Yearbook of Art History, and is currently working on the book Commercial Visions: Science, Trade and Visual Culture in the Dutch Golden Age.

Image: Frederik Ruysch tableau utilizing fetal skeletons and other human remains, from a 1744 etching

More on Observatory can be found here. To sign up for events on Facebook, join our group by clicking here. To sign up for our weekly mailer, click here.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

"Surgery" Worrydoll, Mixed Media, Renée Laferriere Cinderhouse, 2011



"Surgery," Stoneware, Mixed Media, 2011. From the series Worryldoll by Renée Laferriere Cinderhouse. You can see more of her work and find out more here.

Found here.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Anatomy in Korea with Dr. Oh














A few days ago, I met with the very lovely and generous anatomist Dr. Chang-Seok Oh, referred to me by my friend Ross MacFarlane. I had been interested in viewing medical or old natural history collections here in Seoul, and Dr. Oh had kindly offered to take me to see an anatomical collection of a Catholic university hospital where he had a contact. The collection had a number of interesting pieces, the most outstanding being a 17th Century mummy unearthed at an archeological excavation; there were also a number of forensic reconstructions. Images of the collection can be seen above.

Dr. Oh then took me back to his office, where we gushed about our shared interest in post-Vesalius/pre-Gray's Anatomy anatomical history, and where he shared with me his beautiful original copy of the 18th century Ontleedkundige Tafelen. This book, Dr. Oh explained to me, is of the greatest importance to Asian medicine, as it was the first Western medical book translated for Eastern consumption, published in Japan (with some additions from other texts) as Kaitai Shinsho in 1774. The book then made the rounds in Asia, changing the face of Eastern medicine forever. We did a side by side comparison of the original book and a facsimile of the 18th century Japanese Kaitai Shinsho; you can see those side by side comparisons above. I really liked the visual translation that occurs as the images move from the West to the East.

Click on images to see much larger, more detailed versions. Its worth it! And thanks to Ross MacFarlane and Deborah Leem for making this happen!