Friday, March 26, 2010

"Obstetric Tables: Comprising Graphic Illustrations, with Descriptions and Practical Remarks..." George Spratt, 1833






In 1538, Vesalius created Tabulae Sex, attaching a second printed image on top of the first that could be lifted to show the inside and outside of the human body. Euclid’s Elements of Geometry in 1570 incorporated flaps to help the reader envision three dimensional objects (Ex Oversize 2654.331.570q). By the early nineteenth century, the British printmaker George Spratt (ca. 1784-1840) used the same overlay technique for an anatomy atlas entitled Obstetric Tables. Spratt’s volume, first published in London in 1833, includes fifty hand-colored, tipped on flaps, sometimes layered four or five to the same image...
Find out more on Princeton University's Graphic Arts blog--from which all text and images are drawn--by clicking here.

Pictured above: George Spratt, Obstetric Tables: Comprising Graphic Illustrations, with Descriptions and Practical Remarks: Exhibiting on Dissected Plates Many Important Subjects in Midwifery (Philadelphia: James A. Bill, 1850). Lithographs. Gift of Joseph V. Meigs, Class of 1915. Graphic Arts GAX 2010. In process

6 comments:

Pam Morris said...

cool! just showed my daughter who will be going to Princeton in the fall...she is so looking forward to being able to view all this wonderful historic info! thanks for this

holly aka golly said...

Amazing!

Susan said...

OMG. I want that!

Aron said...

Your site is totally awesome, and I love this post!
Obstetrical complications... Scary!

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