Friday, March 29, 2019

NEW EXHIBITION: Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory: Visions of the Afterlife in the Catholic Tradition


EXHIBITION: Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory: Visions of the Afterlife in the Catholic Tradition

Pieces include paintings, photographs, sculptures, historical books and prints dating from the 17th century to the present, and from locations around the world. The show also features a rich collection of Latin American masks, ex votos, and retablos.

April 20 – June 30, 2019; Weekends 12-5; Free and Open to the public
Opening Party: Friday April 26 (more below, tickets here)

In the Catholic worldview, when the body dies, the soul of the deceased is sent to a location in the afterlife to await the final judgment, at which point it will be reunited with the resurrected body. The souls of the unrepentant who have perpetrated the gravest sins are sent to hell, while the most stainless—saints who were martyred for their faith—are delivered straight to heaven. The majority of people, however, are sent to a place called purgatory. In this liminal space—a sort of temporary hell—souls are purged of their sins until they have attained the purity necessary to enter heaven and reside with God.

The idea of purgatory is a contentious one. Originally developed in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, it rose to popularity in the fourteenth century in response to the mass deaths wrought by the Black Plague. Disagreements about purgatory contributed directly to the birth of Protestantism. One of Martin Luther’s major points of contention in his Ninety-Five Theses of 1517 was the Church’s use of indulgences—papal grants promising to shorten or cancel a person’s time in purgatory. Once sold as ubiquitously as lottery tickets, profits were used to fund various projects including the construction of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Since that time, the popularity of purgatory has gone in and out of fashion. Today, it is visible only in rare bastions of belief, such as Naples, Italy, and parts of Latin America. The concepts of heaven and hell, however, continue to thrive in the Catholic ethos.

This exhibition explores Catholic visions of heaven, hell, and purgatory —via art, artifacts, and material culture drawn from The Green-Wood Historic Fund Collections and the greater Morbid Anatomy community—, tracing how they have manifested in various places and shifted and changed over time.

“Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory: Visions of the Afterlife in the Catholic Tradition” and the Morbid Anatomy Library are free and open to the public at the Fort Hamilton Gatehouse on Saturdays and Sundays, 12 –5 PM, from April 20 to June 30. To visit outside of these hours, email events@green-wood.com.

The Gatehouse is located at Fort Hamilton Parkway and Micieli Place, easily accessible on the F and G trains at Fort Hamilton Station. The exhibition and library space are not handicap accessible. Click here for our inclement weather policy.

MORBID ANATOMY LIBRARY AND EXHIBITION OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, April 20th and Sunday, April 21rst
12pm-5pm
Free and no appointment necessary
 
Easter week end, join Morbid Anatomy's Joanna Ebenstein and Laetitia Barbier for an informal gathering to celebrate the Morbid Anatomy Library as we reopen its gorgeous home, the 1877 Fort Hamilton Gate House in Green-Wood Cemetery.

This will also be your first chance to see our new exhibition Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory: Visions of the Afterlife in the Catholic Tradition, a carefully curated selection of art, books, artifacts and ephemera drawn from the Green-Wood archives and the hands and collections of the Morbid Anatomy Community.

PLEASE NOTE: This event takes place at the Fort Hamilton Gatehouse NOT the main entrance of Green-Wood. The Gatehouse is located at Fort Hamilton Parkway and Micieli Place, easily accessible on the F and G trains at Fort Hamilton Station. The exhibition and library space are not handicapped accessible.
 
ENVISIONING THE AFTERLIFE: HEAVEN, HELL AND PURGATORY, EXHIBITION OPENING AND CEMETERY GARDEN PARTY
Friday, April 26, 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Tickets here

Join us for a special after-hours garden party to celebrate the return of spring and the opening of Morbid Anatomy’s new exhibition, Envisioning the Afterlife: Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory.

Enjoy music curated by Friese Undine and complimentary refreshments while taking in the enchanting atmosphere. There will also be a special tour of the newly curated Morbid Anatomy Library by its creators, Joanna Ebenstein and Laetitia Barbier, as well as an opportunity to meet the artists, collectors, and contributors to the exhibition.

PLEASE NOTE: This event takes place at the Fort Hamilton Gatehouse NOT the main entrance of Green-Wood. The Gatehouse is located at Fort Hamilton Parkway and Micieli Place, easily accessible on the F and G trains at Fort Hamilton Station. The exhibition and library space are not handicapped accessible.

Tickets are $15 / $10 for members of Green-Wood and the Morbid Anatomy Patreon.

Morbid Anatomy Library and Exhibition Open House
Saturday, April 20th and Sunday, April 21st
12pm-5pm
Free and no appointment necessary

On this Easter week end, please join Morbid Anatomy's Joanna Ebenstein and Laetitia Barbier for an informal gathering to celebrate the Morbid Anatomy Library as we reopen its gorgeous home, the 1877 Fort Hamilton Gate House in Green-Wood Cemetery.

This will also be your first chance to see our new exhibition: Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory: Visions of the Afterlife in the Catholic Tradition, a carefully curated selection of art, books, artifacts and ephemera drawn from the Green-Wood archives and the hands and collections of the Morbid Anatomy Community.

PLEASE NOTE: This event takes place at the Fort Hamilton Gatehouse NOT the main entrance of Green-Wood. The Gatehouse is located at Fort Hamilton Parkway and Micieli Place, easily accessible on the F and G trains at Fort Hamilton Station. The exhibition and library space are not handicapped accessible.

Images to to bottom:
  1. Purgatory Figure, Guatemala, 2017; Eye's Gallery Collection
  2. Carved charred wood Purgatory figures, Mexico, 1990s; Eye's Gallery Collection
  3. Shrine to the Souls in Purgatory: 19th Century Basilica of Saints Justus and Pastor, Barcelona, Photo by Joanna Ebenstein, 2013
  4. Angel with Charrasca | Equine Jawbone Instrument, Mochitlán, Mexico, 2017; Fuji flex print by Phyllis Galembo
  5. Mexican Retablo / Saint Michael the Archangel, holding a symbol of the all-seeing eye of God while conquering Lucifer in heaven, 19th century; Collection of Deborah Dwyer
  6. Illustration of Hell from the novella The Black Crook: A Most Wonderful History, Lithograph, 1866, The Green-Wood Historic Fund
  7. Holy Week Mask, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1960's; Eye's Gallery Collection
  8. Manuscript page depicting demons in Hell, Rajasthan, India, Early 20th Century; Stephen Romano Gallery Collection


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